Category Archives: Solar

Professor Valentina Zharkova explains and confirms why a “Super” Grand Solar Minimum is upon us

Professor Valentina Zharkova gave a presentation of her Climate and the Solar Magnetic Field hypothesis at the Global Warming Policy Foundation in October, 2018. The information she unveiled should shake/wake you up.

Zharkova was one of the few that correctly predicted solar cycle 24 would be weaker than cycle 23 – only 2 out of 150 models predicted this.

Her models have run at a 93% accuracy and her findings suggest a SuperGrand Solar Minimum is on the cards beginning 2020 and running for 350-400 years.

Continue reading Professor Valentina Zharkova explains and confirms why a “Super” Grand Solar Minimum is upon us

How massive solar eruptions ‘probably’ detonated dozens of US sea mines

by Brett Carter
How massive solar eruptions 'probably' detonated dozens of US sea mines
Credit: NASA

An extraordinary account of the impact space weather had on military operations in Vietnam in 1972 was found buried in the US Navy archives, according to a newly published article in Space Weather.

On August 4, 1972, the crew of a US Task Force 77 aircraft flying near a naval minefield in the waters off Hon La observed 20 to 25 explosions over about 30 seconds. They also witnessed an additional 25 to 30 mud spots in the waters nearby.

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The Chill of Solar Minimum

By: Dr. Tony Phillips

Sept. 27, 2018: The sun is entering one of the deepest Solar Minima of the Space Age. Sunspots have been absent for most of 2018, and the sun’s ultraviolet output has sharply dropped. New research shows that Earth’s upper atmosphere is responding.

“We see a cooling trend,” says Martin Mlynczak of NASA’s Langley Research Center. “High above Earth’s surface, near the edge of space, our atmosphere is losing heat energy. If current trends continue, it could soon set a Space Age record for cold.”

timed
The TIMED satellite monitoring the temperature of the upper atmosphere

These results come from the SABER instrument onboard NASA’s TIMED satellite. SABER monitors infrared emissions from carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO), two substances that play a key role in the energy balance of air 100 to 300 kilometers above our planet’s surface. By measuring the infrared glow of these molecules, SABER can assess the thermal state of gas at the very top of the atmosphere–a layer researchers call “the thermosphere.”

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Solar storm WARNING: Dangerous flare ‘WILL hit Earth’ and could cost Europe £14billion


A DEVASTATING solar storm will hit Earth and could cost Europe £14billion – it has been warned.

By Charlotte Ikonen 

The prediction comes as a weather warning was put in place for this weekend after reports a solar storm could hit our planet.

Continue reading Solar storm WARNING: Dangerous flare ‘WILL hit Earth’ and could cost Europe £14billion

Hole in Sun’s Atmosphere Amps Up Northern Lights

by Mike Wall

Hole in Sun's Atmosphere Amps Up Northern Lights
Hole in Sun’s Atmosphere Amps Up Northern Lights

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft captured this image of a giant hole (dark patch at top) in the sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona, on Sept. 11, 2018. Original ImageCredit: NASA/SDO

The northern lights just got a boost thanks to a big hole in the sun’s atmosphere, and there could be something of a repeat showing tonight.

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New Image Shows How the Sun Changes Over a 22-Year Cycle

The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory has spent 22 years recording Earth’s sun and has given us a full picture of the solar cycle. Credit: SOHO/ESA & NASA

Out of billions of stars in the Milky Way galaxy, there’s one in particular, orbiting 25,000 light-years from the galactic core, that affects Earth day by day, moment by moment. That star, of course, is the sun.While the sun’s activity cycle has been tracked for about two and a half centuries, the use of space-based telescopes offers a new and unique perspective of our nearest star.

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Massive solar storm that will slam Earth March 14, 2018 could knockout power supplies, damage satellites and trigger stunning auroras

A huge solar storm is heading for Earth, and it’s likely to hit tomorrow.

The storm could knockout satellites, disrupt power supplies and spark stunning displays of the Northern Lights.

It was created last week by an enormous explosion in the sun’s atmosphere known as a solar flare, and charged particles from that flare are now on their way to our planet.

The arrival of the solar storm coincides with the formation of ‘equinox cracks’ in Earth’s magnetic field, which some scientists believe form around the equinoxes on March 20 and September 23 each year.

These cracks weaken our planet’s natural protection against charged particles and could leave commercial flights and GPS systems exposed to the incoming storm.
The cracks also mean stargazers are more likely to catch glimpses of the Northern lights this week.

A huge solar storm is heading for Earth, and it’s likely to hit tomorrow. It may trigger the Northern Lights in parts of Scotland and northern England. This animation shows the aurora forecast for Wednesday 14 and Thursday 15 March (time in GMT is shown top right)

Continue reading Massive solar storm that will slam Earth March 14, 2018 could knockout power supplies, damage satellites and trigger stunning auroras

The Northern Lights and other auroras are disappearing from some parts of Earth — but scientists predict a big comeback

aurora australis nasa space station ex52 june 25 2017The Aurora Australis on June 25, 2017, as seen from the International Space Station. NASA

First, the bad news for stargazers: Auroras are going dark in many parts of the world.

The number of these atmospheric light shows won’t bottom out for several years, which means locations far from Earth’s poles — such as the UK and northern continental US — may rarely if ever see the Northern Lights during that time. A study published earlier this year hints this dearth of auroras may last for decades.

But there’s plenty of good news.

Continue reading The Northern Lights and other auroras are disappearing from some parts of Earth — but scientists predict a big comeback

Solar minimum surprisingly constant

Solar minimum surprisingly constant
Solar microwave observation telescopes in 1957 (top left) and today (bottom left). Fluctuations observed during 60 years of solar microwave monitoring (top right) and the solar microwave spectrum at each solar minimum (bottom right). The background is full solar disk images taken by the X-ray telescope aboard the Hinode satellite. Credit: NAOJ/Nagoya University/JAXA

Using more than a half-century of observations, Japanese astronomers have discovered that the microwaves coming from the sun at the minimums of the past five solar cycles have been the same each time, despite large differences in the maximums of the cycles.

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