Category Archives: NASA

Skylab and Space Shuttle Astronaut Owen Garriott Dies at 88

Astronaut Owen Garriott at the Apollo Telescope Mount console

Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot of the Skylab 3 mission, is stationed at the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) console in the Multiple Docking Adapter of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. From this console the astronauts actively control the ATM solar physics telescope. (sl3-108-1288)Credits: NASA

Former astronaut and long-duration spaceflight pioneer Owen Garriott, 88, died today, April 15, at his home in Huntsville, Alabama. Garriott flew aboard the Skylab space station during the Skylab 3 mission and on the Space Shuttle Columbia for the STS-9/Spacelab-1 mission. He spent a total of 70 days in space.

“The astronauts, scientists and engineers at Johnson Space Center are saddened by the loss of Owen Garriott,” said Chief Astronaut Pat Forrester. “We remember the history he made during the Skylab and space shuttle programs that helped shape the space program we have today. Not only was he a bright scientist and astronaut, he and his crewmates set the stage for international cooperation in human spaceflight. He also was the first to participate in amateur radio from space, a hobby many of our astronauts still enjoy today.”

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ISS SSTV – Images from space

ARISS Russia is planning a special Slow Scan Television (SSTV) event from the International Space Station in celebration of Cosmonautics Day.

The transmissions began on April 11 at 11:30 UTC and run through April 14 ending at 18:20 UTC.

The ISS is transmitting on 145.800 MHz FM. The SSTV signal is using PD120. I recommend you record the passes for decoding in case a  live capture has issues decoding. (You may capture two image transmissions during one pass as each one takes 120 seconds.)

When the ISS is nearly overhead, an HT should pickup the transmission. Just angle the radio a bit.

Visit the N2YO.com website to review 10 day predictions (A blue button on the right side). Please note that you will want to choose “all passes” as they initially list only visible ones.

Review images that others have already captured for this event.

Sun Unleashes Monster Solar Flare, Strongest in a Decade

By Sarah Lewin, Space.com Associate Editor


This article was updated at 5:44 p.m. EDT to indicate that a coronal mass ejection was observed coming from the site of the solar flare.

Early this morning (Sept. 6), the sun released two powerful solar flares — the second was the most powerful in more than a decade.

At 5:10 a.m. EDT (0910 GMT), an X-class solar flare — the most powerful sun-storm category — blasted from a large sunspot on the sun’s surface. That flare was the strongest since 2015, at X2.2, but it was dwarfed just 3 hours later, at 8:02 a.m. EDT (1202 GMT), by an X9.3 flare, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC). The last X9 flare occurred in 2006 (coming in at X9.0).

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ARISS SSTV (Update)

In commemoration of the 20th anniversary, the ARISS team is planning to transmit a set of 12 SSTV images that capture the accomplishments of ARISS over that time. While still to be scheduled, they anticipate the SSTV operation to occur around the weekend of July 15. This is now scheduled for Thursday, July 20 until Monday July 24 1800 UTC.
(I record the received audio and then later decode it using a program like MMSSTV)

ARISS Article
FM SSTV downlink (Worldwide) 145.800 MHz
ISS Live Tracking

SSTV received image
Previously received SSTV image



An SSTV image sent from the ISS on Sunday 7/23/2017 around 10:00 PM Pacific. This was a visible pass of the ISS so it was easily tracked with the naked eye, making it easy to aim the antenna.

ISS SSTV
SSTV capture on 7/23/2017

Amateur Radio Payloads Share Ride into Space with Soil Moisture Monitoring Satellite

ARRL.org
February 2, 2015

Amateur Radio Payloads Share Ride into Space with Soil Moisture Monitoring Satellite

Four NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNA-X) CubeSats carrying Amateur Radio payloads launched successfully January 31 from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base. The primary payload for the Delta II launcher was the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. SMAP’s onboard radar will share Amateur Radio spectrum at 1.26 GHz. Amateur Radio is secondary on the 23 centimeter band, which covers 1240 to 1300 MHz.

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Two Astronauts Get Their Ham Ticket

ARRL.org
March 31, 2011

Two Astronauts Get Their Ham Ticket

Even though they aren’t scheduled to go to the International Space Station (ISS) until 2013, two astronauts — Chris Cassidy and Luca Parmitano — are now licensed amateurs. Cassidy, who received the call sign KF5KDR, is scheduled to head to the ISS in March 2013 as part of Expedition 35. Parmitano, who is KF5KDP, goes up three months later in May, as part of Expedition 36.

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Columbia Disaster Amateur Radio Volunteers Remembered

World.HAM RADIO-ONLINE.EN
February 7th, 2011

Amateur Radio Operators remembered for volunteering during Columbia Disaster

NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) – When the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated over East Texas in 2003, hundreds came forward to help with recovery efforts.

Some of those volunteers were ham radio operators who set up communication with law enforcement across East Texas. Saturday, the Nacogdoches Amateur Radio Club held a special event to say thank you.

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NASA Calls for Amateurs to Listen for Satellite

NASA.gov
January 19, 2011
PRESS RELEASE: 11-009

NANOSAIL-D EJECTS: NASA SEEKS AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS’ AID TO LISTEN FOR BEACON SIGNAL

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Wednesday, Jan. 19 at 11:30 a.m. EST, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., confirmed that the NanoSail-D nanosatellite ejected from Fast Affordable Scientific and Technology Satellite, FASTSAT. The ejection event occurred spontaneously and was identified this morning when engineers at the center analyzed onboard FASTSAT telemetry. The ejection of NanoSail-D also has been confirmed by ground-based satellite tracking assets.

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