Amateur Radio Fans ‘Ham’ it up During Festival

Published: January 14, 2007
By BOBBY HARRELL, staff writer
Index-Journal

Lakewood, S.C. – Antenna equipment was among the wares on display during Saturday’s Hamfest.

Emmie Patience, of Belton, lived out her name during Hurricane Hugo in 1989. She was on her ham radio for eight days straight, acting as net manager for a network of radio operators during and after the hurricane, which devastated parts of Puerto Rico, South Carolina and North Carolina.

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The Fellowship of the Hams

Published Saturday, January 6, 2007
By Amanda Pennington
The Daily Pilot

Amateur radio operators can ham it up, but they’re quick to help in an emergency, as a local sailor found when he was stranded.

Gordon and Suzy West have made friends all over the country and all over the world, but not necessarily because of extensive world travel.

The Costa Mesa couple are “hams.” Antennae jut out from the roof of their house, and there’s a room dedicated to two-way and worldwide radios, screens, transceivers and other gadgetry. Gordon West has been a licensed ham radio operator for over 40 years, his wife for about 30 years.

Ham radio is more than a hobby for the Wests and their fellow hams — a fellowship they called a fraternity. It’s a way to stay connected in times of crisis.
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Holding the Torch for ‘Dead’ Morse Code

Published December 31st, 2006
By Miguel Helft, The New York Times
E-Commerce Times

“Freed from all pretense of practical relevance in an age of digital communications, Morse will now become the object of loving passion by radioheads, much as another ‘dead’ language, Latin, is kept alive today by Latin-speaking enthusiasts around the world,” Paul Saffo, a fellow at the Institute for the Future, wrote in his blog.

It may be the ultimate SOS. Morse Code is in distress.

The language of dots and dashes has been the lingua franca of amateur radio, a vibrant community of technology buffs and hobbyists who have provided a communications lifeline in emergencies and disasters.

That community has been shaken, however, by news that the U.S. government will no longer require Morse Code proficiency as a condition for an amateur radio license. It was deemed dispensable because other modes of communicating over radio, like voice, teletype and even video, have grown in popularity.

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NWS: Weather Watcher Numbers Spotty

Published: January 8, 2007
By CAT SIEH
The Union Democrat

The National Weather Service relies on Mother Lode volunteers to fill in the gaps left by its instruments, but current weather watchers are scattered, leaving many areas with a lack of data.

Of 13 watchers in Calaveras County, many are located in the same communities, leaving other areas with just one volunteer.

Getting in touch with that person on short notice can prove challenging for the NWS.

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VE Exam: Fresno/Clovis

AMATEUR RADIO VE EXAMS IN FRESNO/CLOVIS
UNLICENSED THRU EXTRA CLASS
ARRL VEC—AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE 2007

Exams for all Amateur license classes will be conducted on the following dates in Fresno California. All exams are given on Saturday and begin at 9:30 AM.

February 17 & 24 – May 19 – August 18 -November 17

LOCATION:
Bonaventure Mobile Home Park, 1724 Minnewawa Ave Clovis CA 93612-2545. Exams are held in the community room.

DIRECTIONS:
From Highway 99 South of Fresno, exit Clovis Ave. Go north to Shaw and turn left on Shaw to Minnewawa. Turn right on Minnewawa and then left to the Mobile Home Park

From Highway 41 or Highway 99 North of Fresno, take Shaw Ave. exit, turn right (East), to Minnewawa Ave and turn left. Then turn left into the Mobile Home Park.

Theory exams are multiple choice. Express mail is used to send paperwork to ARRL, who sends data to FCC via electronic mail, thus assuring the fastest possible service on new licenses which typically arrive in about two weeks.

BRING:

  • Two ID’s, one with photo
  • Taxpayer ID Number / Social Security Number
  • Fee $14.00 per test session, bring exact change please

IF UPGRADING BRING:

  • ULS registration Number or FCC Registration Number
  • Original and copy of Amateur License and CSCE’s

Talk in on W6T0 146.940 repeater. Walk-in’s only, no pre-registration required.

More Info?? Contact Charles, (559) 431-2038

Radio Operator Celebrated for Helping Save Sailor

10:00 PM PST on Tuesday, January 9, 2007
By JOAN OSTERWALDER
The Press-Enterprise

A Riverside ham radio operator was hailed as a hero by the family of an American sailor who was rescued in the South American sea and arrived safely back in the United States on Tuesday.

Michael Morales, 55, was a lifeline to the family of Ken Barnes, who was adrift for three days more than 500 miles from the Chilean coast after a storm disabled his yacht.

Barnes, 47, of Newport Beach, attempted to become the first solo sailor to circle the globe from the West Coast. He left Long Beach on Oct. 28 and ran into a fierce storm that damaged his 44-foot ketch. Barnes called for help Jan. 2 and was picked up Friday by the fishing trawler Polar Pesca 1, backed by Chilean navy aircraft.
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HAM Operators Practice for the Times they’re Needed

Saturday, January 6, 2007
By Curt Hodges
The Jonesboro Sun

JONESBORO — While the Internet, cell phones and other modern means of communications are the hot things today, amateur radio is still the old standby.

During disasters, when all electricity is gone, ham radio operators are still the first-line crew — after practicing for the time they will be needed.

They’re all volunteers, giving of their own time, equipment and other things, said Jack Richardson of Jonesboro, a longtime amateur radio operator and retired as Craighead County’s director of emergency services and preparedness.

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Arkansas Radio Club Making Great (Air)waves

By Matt Doran
DAILY PRESS & ARGUS

Becoming a licensed amateur radio operator in 1968, when hobby radio was in its “infantile” stages, proved a fateful decision for Brighton Township’s Jim Kvochick.

As a young man, he landed a job with a radio station because employers there figured he could pass the commercial radio test if he’d passed his amateur radio test, he said. Now 54 years old, Kvochick has been able to leverage his hobby of exploring technology into a position as a technology consultant for AT&T, a job he said he enjoys.

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Amateur Radio in Fresno County and the Central Valley of California