Category Archives: Amateur Radio

Amateur Radio Parity Act is Introduced in US Senate

The Amateur Radio Parity Act was introduced in the US Senate on July 12, marking another step forward for this landmark legislation. Senators Roger Wicker (R-MS) and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) are the Senate sponsors. The measure will, for the first time, guarantee all radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities governed by a homeowner’s association (HOA) or subject to any private land use regulations, the right to erect and maintain effective outdoor antennas at their homes. The Senate bill, S. 1534, is identical to H.R. 555, which passed the US House of Representatives in January.

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Group Selected to Pursue DXpedition to Baker Island National Wildlife Refuge

The Pacific Islands Refuges and Monuments Office of the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has selected the Dateline DX Association (DDXA) — the DXpedition group that activated Howland Island in 2009 and Wake Island in 1998 — to pursue a DXpedition to Baker Island. Dates have not yet been determined. Baker and Howland Islands (KH1) are part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (PRIMNM), created by former President George W. Bush in 2009. Baker and Howland is the fourth most-wanted DXCC entity on Club Log’s DXCC Most Wanted List.

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Band Plan Proposed for Eventual 472-479 kHz Use

ARRL 630-Meter Experiment Coordinator Fritz Raab, W1FR, has proposed an informal band plan for the pending 472-479 kHz band. Raab said that once US radio amateurs are granted access to 630 meters, he would move stations operating under the blanket WD2XSH FCC Experimental (Part 5) license to 461-472 kHz.

“This will clear the amateur frequencies, while allowing the experimenters to run unattended propagation beacons without using the limited bandwidth that will be available to amateurs,” Raab explained in his spring 630-Meter Experiment Project Status quarterly report. “The new 630-meter band will have a very limited amount of spectrum (7 kHz).”

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CARP Field Day 2017 RSVP

Field Day is the most popular amateur radio on-the-air event of the year. This is where amateur radio operators gather with their clubs to operate from remote locations. This is an opportunity to demonstrate to the public our response capabilities.

CARP will be holding Field Day at Pine Ridge School located at the top of the 168 four-lanes east of Fresno. All local amateurs and the public is invite to attend the event.

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FCC Part 97 Ham Radio Changes

On June 14 the FCC WRC–12 Implementation Report and Order was published in the US Federal Register

The Federal Communications Commission has implemented allocation changes from the World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2012) (WRC–12) and updated its service rules. The Commission took this action to conform its rules, to the extent practical, to the decisions that the international community made at WRC–12.

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Hundreds of Stations Report Hearing WSPR Signal from Canada C3 Expedition

Hundreds of Amateur Radio stations have reported receiving the WSPR signal being transmitted by CG3EXP on 20, 30, and 40 meters from the Canada C3 expedition. The expedition, which got under way on June 1 and will continue until October 28, is part of Canada’s Sesquicentennial Celebration. The Canada C3 vessel Polar Prince is sailing from Toronto to Victoria via the Northwest Passage. It’s currently in Cornwall, Ontario, before proceeding to Montreal for the final stop on the first of 15 planned legs of its journey. The 220-foot long Polar Prince, a former Canadian Coast Guard vessel, is a research icebreaker.

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Amateur Radio Net Activated in Wake of Magnitude 6.9 Earthquake in Guatemala

An Amateur Radio net has been activated in the aftermath of a magnitude 6.9 earthquake early this morning (June 14) some 10 kilometers from Malacatán.

According to information relayed by Dani Ardon, TG9AMD, of the Radio Amateurs Club of Guatemala (CRAG), “At the moment, neither major damage nor reports of any victims have been reported.” Ardon said the net has been monitoring 7.090 MHz as well as the 146.88 MHz CRAG Network frequency.

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Spacecraft Probe to Listen for ARRL Field Day Signals

The Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) onboard the Canadian CAScade Smallsat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE) satellite will again support Amateur Radio citizen science by listening for signals during ARRL Field Day, June 24-25. The HamSCI citizen science initiative says that, from a radio science perspective, Field Day is an ideal time for e-POP to study the structure of Earth’s ionosphere using participants’ transmissions. HamSCI was started by ham-scientists who study upper atmospheric and space physics.

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CARP Field Day 2017 RSVP

Field Day is the most popular amateur radio on-the-air event of the year. This is where amateur radio operators gather with their clubs to operate from remote locations. This is an opportunity to demonstrate to the public our response capabilities.

CARP will be holding Field Day at Pine Ridge School located at the top of the 168 four-lanes east of Fresno. All local amateurs and the public is invite to attend the event.

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Amateur radio: why and how

by Donald Bauer, Special to the Courier

Have you ever wondered about amateur radio? The people who are involved in the hobby are called hams. Most of us are unsure of the origin of the “ham” title, but we do generally like to “ham it up” on our radios.

For the uninitiated, amateur radio is a licensed form of communication over moderate to very long distance, using two-way radio. Many old-timers got involved long before the introduction of computers and cellphones. So, many people today think of the ham radio operator as a historical oddity. However, there are far more licensed radio amateurs today than ever before. Why?

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